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Twin Forearm Block/Knife-hand inward strike

How many opponents, and direction of strike
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Original Message Post # 1
Tue 21st Jan 2014 03:34
JBCAlaska

USA-3-1212
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Joined: 20/09/2010
Topics: 6 Replies: 14

I was recently informed that in movements 1 & 2 (and subsequently  moves 4 & 5, 13 & 14, and 16 & 17), we should consider only one opponent to the direction of our outer forearm block, or to the side. To follow up on this, our knife-hand strike is therefore in the direction of our L-stance, rather than to ~45 degrees (or slightly forward) as if we were striking a second opponent after a rising block. All the figures in the encyclopedia support two attackers. I am curious as to why we would now view this as only one attacker? Either way is fine, but I would appreciate a formal reading on this as it changes the facing and the thinking as you perform (and teach!)

 

Taekwon~

John Carnahan - ITFUSITF -- Alaska, USA
Post # 2
Top Thu 23rd Jan 2014 07:53
O. Braemer

GER-6-1002
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Joined: 04/12/2006
Topics: 7 Replies: 22
Dear Sir,

ask the one who told you that there is only one opponent in the direction of the forearm block, what he is doing with the knife hand and how he would hit this opponent. If the knife hand should hit the opponent in the direction of the the forearm block, it is not possible. So we have two possibilities:
1. There is only one attacker from the direction of the rising block which we defend and attack with the knife hand and then we attack a second attacker with the puch coming in after the knife hand.
This could be possible because not every technique in a Tul has the function it was disigned for.

2. Two attackers at the same time. Perform as descriped in the enzyclopedia.

Taekwon

Learning is a process which never ends and where you have to be afraid to forget what you have learned.

Post # 3
Top Mon 27th Jan 2014 04:35
JBCAlaska

USA-3-1212
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Sir - Thank you for your reply. I am pleased that there are still some who continue to monitor and use this forum, albeit much less than I would like to see. Part of the conversation surrounding this topic was that the knife-hand rising block was essentially in preparation for the strike. I agree that striking to the side from the L stance seems to leave you with a very limited range. Further, the follow up sliding punch would not coincide with your knife-hand target. Since some things do change within the ITF, I was seeking an ITF clarification on this issue.

Thank you again for taking the time to respond.

John
John Carnahan - ITFUSITF -- Alaska, USA
Post # 4
Top Tue 28th Jan 2014 13:11
O. Braemer

GER-6-1002
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Topics: 7 Replies: 22
Sir,
calrification is that you cannot hit an opponent with the inward knife hand strike which attack you have blocked with the forehand side knife hand block.
So, you use youre knife hand rising block to defend and then attack this attacker with the inward knife hand strike.
In this pattern there are two attackers which you have to defend and attack.

Let one of your students attack you with a front punch to the head (correct distance) and at the same time one with a middle side kick. Block the punch with the rising knife hand and the kick with the side knife hand. Both fits perfect for a counterattack .

Regards

Learning is a process which never ends and where you have to be afraid to forget what you have learned.

Post # 5
Top Wed 29th Jan 2014 04:16
JBCAlaska

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Thank you again. I understand and have agreed with your assessment, but need to change my perspective just slightly to accommodate the following. The latest information from our Master, following up on information previously provided during an IIC seminar, is that the rising block is protective of the head as if the attacker is directly in front (say 90 degrees, and not at angle). This rising block hand should be thought of as a chamber for the following knife-hand strike, which is directed to the side-front, but actually about 15 degrees toward center, aligned somewhat with your front foot (like moves 21-23 in Hwa-Rang). Even though your primary target is to side, your knife-hand strike is to the same general direction (15 degrees inward), followed with a punch to side. I guess that fits with the encyclopedia pictures and the overall intent, just not with the manner in which I had envisioned it (or trained others)...but that can be changed!

Thank you again.

Taekwon~
John Carnahan - ITFUSITF -- Alaska, USA
Post # 6
Top Wed 29th Jan 2014 10:45
O. Braemer

GER-6-1002
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Sorry Sir for talking the whole time about a rising side hand block. Of course it's a twin forearm block.
If you want to block a punch or whatever with the rising block coming from 90 degrees you have to stay side facing instead half facing. If you perform Ninja Sogi naturally and the rising block without any stiffness in your shoulders than you will stay half facing (what is correct) and the forearm of the rising block will point to the correct direction.
In the enzyclopedia the picture is not that good made.
Try one easy thing: go into gunnun sogi and perforn pandae chookyo makgi (reverse rising block). now keep the arm as it is and change your position into niunja sogi. And you will see where the forearm is. Not to 90 degrees.

Regards

Learning is a process which never ends and where you have to be afraid to forget what you have learned.

Post # 7
Top Mon 10th Feb 2014 11:59
G Horan

GBR-7-1017
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Dear Sir's,
This block can be against one or two opponents, I believe in this pattern it is two. Not sure if this helps or not, but remember an inward strike finishes on the chest line.
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