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Strikes to the rear and head movements

Technical
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Original Message Post # 1
Tue 8th Jul 2008 06:21
Michael Munyon

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Greetings,
 
I was having a discussion with another black belt about a technique which is found in Choong-Moo as well as other of our ITF Tuls. 
 
Upset fingertip thrust from left walking stance and then shift into right L-stance and execute low forearm block and a rear strike with back fist. 
 
Why don't we look backwards while executing the backfist strike behind us?  I've always been taught as a color belt to look where I'm striking.  Keep your eye on the target and etc.  Yet we don't look behind us when executing this particular technique.  Note:  When I say look back, I don't mean a full second with the head turn, but rather a very quick head turn to see your strike hit it's imaginary target and then look to your front.  Just a quick momentary glance backwards then back forward. 
 
We do however look backwards in Bending Ready Stance B, elbow thrusts to the rear and other techniques.  Why don't we with the backfist strike in the case of Choong-Moo or the side block in Sam-Il?
 
When I think about it I can argue this in different ways.  We are both blocking and striking at the same time.  What takes priority?  I would say the block because if you miss with a strike you will be ok, but if you miss with a block you could be done for.
 
On the flip side since the backfist strike is so close it is important to see what you're striking.  It's a knife technique for those who understand what I mean by that statement.
 
Master Peter Sanders from the Netherlands explained to me that in Toi-Gye Tul, General Choi taught him that you don't look behind you in technique #3 because you are using the opponent's eyes who is standing in front of you to see the person behind you who is receiving the backfist strike (I actually like that explaination). 
 
If there is a technical reason for it, please share so I can explain why we don't look back to my students.
 
Thanks.
Michael Munyon, VI Dan
US-ITF Armed Forces Director
Serving America, Armed Forces and the ITF
Post # 2
Top Tue 8th Jul 2008 08:20
Jon_Mackey

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Mr Munyon,
I asked this question to President Choi in Ireland in 2006. He explained that when two blocks/strikes are performed at the same time, one automatically becomes the secondary movement. In Choong Moo the primary block is the outer forearm low block, the secondary movement being the dung joomuck, adding that defence of the body was most important in this case. The target is then taken down with the sun sulkut tulgi.

Hope that helps sir!
We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars - Oscar Wilde
 
 
Post # 3
Top Tue 8th Jul 2008 10:54
Michael Munyon

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Hello Mr. Mackey,

Thanks for the info and the reference. Makes sense to concentrate on the primary action in this case.
Michael Munyon, VI Dan
US-ITF Armed Forces Director
Serving America, Armed Forces and the ITF
Post # 4
Top Tue 8th Jul 2008 13:47
M. Hildering

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I was told that you don't really look at either the block or the backfist strike. Instead of looking at one target, you keep your 'vision' centered, so you can look from the corner of your eyes at both 'targets'.
 
By this i mean that you don't focus at one thing, but at the overall view. This is also what comes in with sparring. Because this way you can see the whole picture and you won't be easily surprised by an attack.

On the other side; it can make you react at a fake technique as well.

But the explanations given here make sense to me too.
Taekwon!
 
~ Never leave people confused ~
Post # 5
Top Tue 8th Jul 2008 19:10
Michael Munyon

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So you are actually utilizing the rods in the eyes versus the cones?
Michael Munyon, VI Dan
US-ITF Armed Forces Director
Serving America, Armed Forces and the ITF
Post # 6
Top Thu 10th Jul 2008 11:12
M. Hildering

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I think so.

Actually, it's like certain birds while hunting; like an eagle. Eagles don't search for their targets, but they look at the whole image. So when the image changes (when something moves in the grass or bushes), the bird will pick his target.

So when performing the block and backfist strike, it is easier to have this whole image view, without concentrating at one target, to pick out the real threat, because there isn't a real opponent (yet).
Taekwon!
 
~ Never leave people confused ~
Post # 7
Top Tue 29th Jul 2008 07:24
Jack Martin

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Hello Gentlemen,

I've got a concept for you to consider. Is it possible that your concentration goes to the front block as the most important thing is not to get hit or striken? That focusing on "making the block" to protect yourself gives priority over the rear strike in this case?

What's your opinion?

Thanks,

Jack Martin, IVth
US-ITF/ITF

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